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Archive for March, 2014

A Nice Find On Vinyl

March 25, 2014 Leave a comment

Hi there, how have you been?

This week while visiting an antiquarium my girl decided to pick an old Chico Buarque vinyl to inaugurate our new-old record player… :P And despite being a generic compilation there was a nice, unexpected find in it.

Chico has composed a song–along Roberto Menescal–called Bye bye Brasil to be a part of the homonym movie by Cacá Diegues late in the 70s; and re-recorded it one year later for one of his official albums. The fact is the original movie’s recording was never released again in digital format (even in the late Cacá Diegues music compilation the version there is the wrong one as far as I know) and could only be found in the original (and rare) soundtrack records.

Needless to say how happy I was to find out that the version in that compilation was the older one. I’m pretty sure it was included there by mistake since the sleeve notes talk about Chico’s personal album… :P Lucky me, I guess. :)

Here you can give both versions a listen–I’ve uploaded mine to YouTube. :) The original has more of a black music, 70s mood to it, while the other in more leaned towards latin rhythms.

Enjoy ’em, take care!

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12 Years A Slave: Sound Design

March 18, 2014 Leave a comment

Hi there, how have you all been?

First of all I must state it makes me sad to belong mankind. Of course, the movie brings nothing new to the table, but facing the fact we can (still nowadays, mind you) be so absurdly grotesque to each other kills a part of me everytime I do it.

That said…

12 Years a Slave

Aside the story, the brutality itself and the strong acting what really makes the movie land its punches in my modest opinion is the sound design–even more than the music score, which would be a more usual emotional artifice in that regard.

Music in such a movie can become a cheap trick if misused; the strenght needed to pass the feelings on lies on being realistic, in… immersing the spectator in sorrow. Seeing blood spilling can be shocking for sure, but hearing whiplashes tearing flesh apart is just plain terrifying–more than anything else. And there’s plenty of loud-and-clear pain to be heard here.

Here’s a trailer but that doesn’t do the sound design any justice, really. I hope you watch the movie and, aside taking technical notes, it serves the purpose of making you ponder on everyone’s deeds and how to make things better for generations to come.

See ya, yake care.

The Perfect Songwritter and His Ideal Interpreter

March 11, 2014 Leave a comment

Hi there, how have you been?

After recalling the interesting soundtrack for Allen’s Midnight in Paris and giving it another listen I couldn’t help being knocked back by Mr. Cole Porter once again. It’s still shocking for me to realize how absurdly rich in content his lyrics were even when restrained–no, I should say potentized–by nothing less than impeccable metrics and intonation. What saddens me is to see people these days emulating that sonority by simply being mellow without getting even close to the real thing when it comes to words, packing nostalgia in a goofy wrapper as if it was always like that. But that’s not my point, actually. :P

My point is… Man, songs can get heavenly (or hellish, if we take malice into account lol) when you got such a voice to bear ’em. If you really want to dig Cole Porter go straight to Ella Fitzgerald‘s songbook:

Ella

The otherwordly instrument she had at disposal was the perfect way for every hidden secret inside those songs to unfold. The tremolo, the breathing, the glissandos, the sudden drops… Everything matches the needs of each song–without losing a single hair of fun in the way.

Take my favourite one from that batch, “Let’s Do It“, which can be proud of showing lyrics like this:

Romantic sponges, they say, do it
Oysters down in oyster bay do it
Let's do it, let's fall in love

Cold Cape Cod clams, 'gainst their wish, do it
Even lazy jellyfish, do it
Let's do it, let's fall in love

See ya, take care!

The Sound of The Shining

March 4, 2014 Leave a comment

This weekend I had the chance to watch Kubrick’s “The Shining” in a theater… And despite having seen it before it was even more terrifying now than it was in the first time I saw it. Of course, I underestimated the big screen… and Bartok. :)

Take a listen to this post from Hope Lies At 24 Frames Per Second to know what I’m talking about. ;)

Take care, see ya!

Hope Lies at 24 Frames Per Second

 

When John Williams first read the screenplay for Schindler’s List, he expressed his doubts to Steven Spielberg: “You need a better composer,” he said. “I know,” the director replied, “but they’re all dead.” Spielberg’s approach was normal of film directors – to get the best film composer he could find to write an original soundtrack for his film. The approach taken by Stanley Kubrick was different.

Kubrick was rare among film directors in his knowledge of the art world outside of music. He was an experienced photographer, and many of his films were adaptations of works by the great writers of his day. But he also had a deep knowledge of classical music, both historical and of his own time. This can be seen throughout his films, in the famous scenes from A Clockwork Orange and 2001: A Space Odyssey with music by Beethoven, Rossini and Strauss, but…

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