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Game Music Heads-Up!

April 22, 2014 Leave a comment

Hi there, how have you all been?

Just wanted to share the latest Game Music Bundle around, with some terrific work for just only $1. Yeah, unmissable, I know. :)

Game Music Bundle 7

Right now I’m listening through the awesome Lufthausers soundtrack by Jukio “Kozilek” Kallio… And there’s still much more to dig. Stay with that tune and dare not to go for it. :)

See ya, take care!

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Two Birds With One Stone

April 15, 2014 5 comments

Hi there, how have you been?

As a subscriber of La Blogothèque I’m used to every now and then be surprised by something above average reaching my mail inbox–specially when great production values are guaranteed there–but this week was simply astounding. :)

Just wanted to share two absolutely terrific voices I just got to know thanks to them: Bill Callahan and Ella Eyre. Check them out for yourselves and dare to disagree. ;)

Ella Eyre

See ya, take care!

April 1st?

April 1, 2014 8 comments

Just take this as my treat. ;)

See ya, take care!

12 Years A Slave: Sound Design

March 18, 2014 Leave a comment

Hi there, how have you all been?

First of all I must state it makes me sad to belong mankind. Of course, the movie brings nothing new to the table, but facing the fact we can (still nowadays, mind you) be so absurdly grotesque to each other kills a part of me everytime I do it.

That said…

12 Years a Slave

Aside the story, the brutality itself and the strong acting what really makes the movie land its punches in my modest opinion is the sound design–even more than the music score, which would be a more usual emotional artifice in that regard.

Music in such a movie can become a cheap trick if misused; the strenght needed to pass the feelings on lies on being realistic, in… immersing the spectator in sorrow. Seeing blood spilling can be shocking for sure, but hearing whiplashes tearing flesh apart is just plain terrifying–more than anything else. And there’s plenty of loud-and-clear pain to be heard here.

Here’s a trailer but that doesn’t do the sound design any justice, really. I hope you watch the movie and, aside taking technical notes, it serves the purpose of making you ponder on everyone’s deeds and how to make things better for generations to come.

See ya, yake care.

The Sound of The Shining

March 4, 2014 Leave a comment

This weekend I had the chance to watch Kubrick’s “The Shining” in a theater… And despite having seen it before it was even more terrifying now than it was in the first time I saw it. Of course, I underestimated the big screen… and Bartok. :)

Take a listen to this post from Hope Lies At 24 Frames Per Second to know what I’m talking about. ;)

Take care, see ya!

Hope Lies at 24 Frames Per Second

 

When John Williams first read the screenplay for Schindler’s List, he expressed his doubts to Steven Spielberg: “You need a better composer,” he said. “I know,” the director replied, “but they’re all dead.” Spielberg’s approach was normal of film directors – to get the best film composer he could find to write an original soundtrack for his film. The approach taken by Stanley Kubrick was different.

Kubrick was rare among film directors in his knowledge of the art world outside of music. He was an experienced photographer, and many of his films were adaptations of works by the great writers of his day. But he also had a deep knowledge of classical music, both historical and of his own time. This can be seen throughout his films, in the famous scenes from A Clockwork Orange and 2001: A Space Odyssey with music by Beethoven, Rossini and Strauss, but…

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Categories: Random

A Great, Underrated Soundtrack Given the Proper Attention. :)

February 11, 2014 Leave a comment

Hi there, how have you been?

Coincidentaly in a week I was digging my ol’ Bomberman II (NES) cart to make some scans I stumbled on this fortunate surprise: its soundtrack is now neatly organized at Soundcloud. :)

Bomberman II

June Chikuma–the awesome composer behind the work–was kind enough to upload a lot of videogame stuff at her profile there and there are plenty of lessons to be taken for free. My favorite one is the aforementioned Bomberman II OST because in this work she managed to expand former ideas to unconceivable depths at the time and turned something until then only catchy into some really classic pieces.

Without further ado, enjoy her generosity and take a listen yourself. I’m sure you’re gonna enjoy it. :)

Take care, see ya!

Goldsmith: Laying Eggs. :)

January 28, 2014 2 comments

Hi there, how have you been?

Last week I talked about the wide, wild world of Jerry Goldsmith and how I’m digging his work deeper to scavenge myself some invaluable lessons. :) Well, as previously announced this week’s movie was the very first Alien in the series–the one directed by Ridley Scott.

Alien belongs to a fairly big teenager list of favorite sci-fi movies, but watching to it now–and paying its soundtrack the proper attention–as an adult made me realize it’s much more an horror movie than a plain, regular sci-fi shot. Of course, any sci-fi plot must have a tendency towards a thrilling atmosphere due to the inherent “unknown” factor, but several details–the soundtrack being the most important–hint the real intent behind the lens.

Alien (1979)

I could talk about the picture’s slow pace, about the long-lasting silences, the dark palette, the cinematography… but this being a music blog I think it’s better to stay safe at home. :P And Goldsmith’s formula here could easily be represented in a simple pie chart: 70% horror, 30% sci-fi. :)

The horror side of the pie is achieved by strings tricks well-known since Mr. Bernard Herrmann; the sci-fi one comes through more modern techniques involving electronic devices and resulting in effects like delay and reverberation in general. But the final word is the OST is really a case of “greater than the sum of its parts”. The cues for “monster approaching”–which are delivered through dynamics put to good use–influenced generations to come of horror/sci-fi composers.

I’ll leave you with a sample piece on the matter, and another of my favorite soundtracks in any medium: Super Metroid (SNES), by Kenji Yamamoto and Minako Hamano. My bet is some of those seeds sprouted in Japan… ;)

See ya, take care!

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