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Posts Tagged ‘composition’

Thomas Was Alone… But Surrounded By Some Beautiful Procedural Music. :)

July 29, 2013 Leave a comment

Hi there, how have you been?

This week I was reading my July issue of Edge magazine and a quick Q&A with the composer David Housden has caught my attention. Luckily the full interview was featured in their site and that’s what I wanted to share here this week. :)

Housden scored a game called Thomas Was Alone, and from the start he had to face the challenge of lending simple, faceless geometric forms some emotion; more than that, the developer asked him to craft a procedural pile of freely randomizable pieces of music–which can be a technical pain placed over the already-tough creative task previously mentioned… :P

Since I’m a fierce admirer of the modular music created by the group Geinoh Yamashirogumi in Akira this couldn’t resound more within me. :)

Take a read and enjoy this short anouncement trailer as you listen to the smooth piano behind it.

That’s it, have an awesome week!

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Spaghetti Western Music… No, Duck Dodgers Music. :)

June 17, 2013 Leave a comment

Hi there, how have you been?

This week I was intending to talk about Tarantino’s Django Unchained soundtrack… But listening to it led me to Ennio Morricone, which led me to Spaghetti Western movies and also to his record with Hayley Westenra (who worked in the Endless Ocean–a Wii videogame–soundtrack)… You know, I can get quite curious at times. lol

So… For now I’ll share something that doesn’t deserve to be forgotten and can arguably be considered in the same league of the works mentioned above–I’m serious here. -.- The soundtrack for the cartoon Duck Dodgers, by Tom Jones and Flaming Lips. :) Give the main theme a listen and dare not to agree. ;)

That’s it for now, see ya next Monday!

A Tough Variation For An Almost Exhausted Theme. :P

June 10, 2013 Leave a comment

Hi there, how have you been?

This week I finally got back to my work in the indie videogame caled “HIVE” and we needed another variation of our very first soundtrack theme. Since I’ve already done a bunch of them this one has proven to be a tough one to figure out… :P Anyway it’s finished and hopefully it gets the job done. :)

The trick here was to shift the original time signature from 3/4 to 4/4… Turning a waltz into a ragtime. lol

I hope you like it…

For you reference here are the older entries on the same matter. :)

Have an awesome week! :D

Brazillian Poetry… Becomes Brazillian Music. :)

December 10, 2012 1 comment

Hi there, how are you all doing?

This week I was reading a marvelous, underrated Brazillian poetess called Cora Coralina and I must say I’m absolutely enchanted with her work. She spent her entire life making cakes and candies and only published her first book after her husband died–she was 75 years old at the time.

Her poems taste like something very… immemorial since she lived in a countryside environment that never really evolved–even nowadays, I must say.

As for my turn I tried to keep my music faithful to that mood by choosing instruments that are closely related to that countryside ancient tradition here… Don’t expect any samba, it’s much more “inner” than that. lol

I used a zabumba, an agogô and a shaker for the rhythmic section and also a viola caipira to help an acoustic guitar with the strings sounds.

I really hope you like it, see ya!

[...]

O trigo dourando
a terra padrão.
Dizendo fartura,
certeza de pão.
A cana acamada
vestindo de verde
a terra lavrada.
Cafezais montam guarda
e mandam a mensagem
da terra vermelha -
do Paraná.

Entradas. Estradas.
Picadas, balizas
avançam pra frente.
Rodagens. Asfalto.
Carroças. Carretas. Tratores.

Apitos de usinas.
Motores. Vapores.

Criadores. Currais.
Riquezas que espelha
a terra vermelha
do Paraná.

Giram-girando
às voltas do sol
os campos floridos
dos girassóis.
O rami alastrado,
conjugado
ao verde entonado
das amoreiras.
E os grandes ranchões
do bicho-da-seda
fiando a riqueza
da terra vermelha
do Paraná.

[...]

Following the Last Post… lol A New Recording. :)

November 5, 2012 Leave a comment

Hi there, how are you all doing?

Just like promised last week here’s the recording I was talking about, “Frustração”. It’s part of my band’s (“Salvante Norte”) first EP, and it brings that… desolation feeling up to the table through the recording quality of the leading voice.

The track starts rather upbeat as the singer throws some crooner mood into the game… But the fake posture is truly revealed when all the other instruments stop and the voice is shown naked, just like it REALLY is (around 1:00 or so). The real sadness behind the song is there, unmasked.

I hope you can get the grab of it despite the lyrics in Portuguese–feel free to ask me about the meanings though. :P

See ya, have a nice week!

Arrangement Over Composition: Sometimes it Works Quite Well

September 24, 2012 Leave a comment

Hi there guys, how are you doing?

Most of the times I would rather go with a good composition than with a good arrangement… Because composing is a craft that leans toward creativity (which I prefer if you didn’t notice yet lol) while arranging leans toward technique (which is necessary but more… cold if I’m allowed to say that).

Regarding videogame soundtracks one of the franchises I always pay atention to is Castlevania. The very first installment in the series (back in the middle 80s) had some truly spetacular music (by Kinuyo Yamashita, AKA James Banana lol) that stood out because of its absurd diversity without departing from the strong terror and adventure mood required for such a game. And ever since it’s been like this; from the hardware limitations of the series’ beginnings until nowadays Castlevania music is all about composition over arrangement.

But curiously one of my favorite soundtracks in the saga takes the reverse route… and succeeds brilliantly. Dawn of Sorrows is the first Nintendo DS iteration and the arrangement job there to make the most of the music coming out from the tiny NDS speakers is simply superb. [ Cheers Masahiko Kimura San for that. ;) ]

Take these two nice examples: the first one is called “Condemned Tower” and takes advantage of an unpredictable triangle (percussion); the other sends me chills down the spine with its music box playing a devilish waltz and it’s called “Demon Guest House”. -.-

Take your time, enjoy!

John Williams Gave Me a Hard Time Sleeping. lol

August 6, 2012 Leave a comment

Hi there, how are you doing?

Last week I mentioned my studies on the soundtrack for Tintin by Mr. John Williams… Well, and I must say I couldn’t really put my brain to rest after watching the movie. lol The intrincate rhythmic cells and timbres palettes made my mind work even if I didn’t want to… :P

When I woke up I finally managed to figure my theme out and recorded a short sketch. :) The bar notation is 7/8, and the piano works in an ostinatum–kind of an obsession of some sort. lol I hope you like it!

See ya!

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